Electrosonic World 18 - page 26-27

MUSEUMS
27
Country Music
The new museum celebrates the historic
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considered the origin of modern country
music. Held by the Victor Talking Machine
Company in a local hat warehouse, the
sessions were made possible by the advent
of portable audio recording technology,
and marked the commercial debuts of the
legendary Jimmie Rodgers and the Carter
family.
The 24,000-square foot museum is in a
vintage building that formerly housed a
truck dealership. Electrosonic was brought
into the project in its early stages by
Washington, D.C.-based Hillmann & Carr,
who produced the museum’s video content
and handled interactive programming.
Electrosonic’s Design Consulting team
worked with StudioMUSarx in Philadelphia
on the initial exhibit design and its Orlando
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systems for the facility. SH Acoustics of
Milford, CT was the acoustic and audio
consultant to Electrosonic. Burwil was the
general contractor for the museum.
Straddling the Virginia and Tennessee
state lines, the town of Bristol opened
the Birthplace of Country Music
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Throughout the museum, interactive
exhibits equipped with 32-inch ELO
touch screens engage visitors in aspects
of the Bristol Sessions. “Way Back
Machines” enable visitors to scroll through
photographs showing Bristol over the
years. Four “Mixing Stations” allow them
to change the mix on assorted tracks from
the sessions. Two “Bristol Remastered”
interactives, with Brown Innovations
directional loudspeakers, showcase
session tunes covered by contemporary
artists. An interactive recording booth
invites visitors to sing along in their own
version of the famous Bristol Sessions,
and “Send a Postcard” lets them choose a
digital postcard design to email to family
and friends.
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theaters, four of which were equipped
by Electrosonic. The largest of them, the
Orientation Theater, shows the video,
“Bound to Bristol,” about the musical
heritage of the Bristol Sessions. The
theater is equipped with an InFocus
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Photographs (left to right, clockwise):
• The Museum.
• The Immersion Theater – with room to dance!
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• One of the “Mixing Stations.”
The 7,000 sq ft (750 sq m) exhibition, has 24 exhibits in three
exploration zones with the themes of “Invent,” “Play” and “Inspire.”
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original artifacts, which become creative platforms for the exploration
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“Beyond Rubik’s Cube” is dominated by bright colors and strong
geometric shapes. Professor Rubik is quizzed about his famous
puzzle in an interview seen on a 55-inch Samsung portrait monitor.
Bright yellow guest stations in the Cube Symphony exhibit, designed
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visitors the chance to tackle cube-themed games, and a 100-inch
Ideum Pano multitouch table is big enough for eight or ten players to
collaborate on making tessellation patterns.
The exhibition is designed to travel; after six months at Liberty Science
Center, it starts a seven-year international road trip. The exhibit uses
an AMX system controller with tablet control. The Liberty Science
Center itself can host the entire system and can monitor, update and
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The exhibition was designed by the Science Center’s own Exhibits
Development Group, and fabricated by Maltbie, a Kubik company, who
appointed Electrosonic to take responsibility for audio-visual design,
integration and installation.
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Beyond
The colorful Rubik’s Cube made its debut 40 years
ago and continues to delight and intrigue puzzlers
today. A new twist on the puzzle, a touring
exhibition entitled “Beyond Rubik’s Cube,” recently
opened at the Liberty Science Center in Jersey
City, NJ.
Photographs top to bottom:
• Visitors enter through a tunnel (right) where multiple Microsoft Kinect cameras and
Panasonic projectors with ultra short throw 0.3 lenses generate real-time fractal
images.
• On the extreme left is one of 20 Samsung tablets used both as exhibits and as
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• A wall mosaic created from hundreds of Rubik’s Cubes accompanied by a video about
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• A giant 10 ft. tall working Rubik’s Cube that can be controlled by visitors.
projector, Renkus-Heinz loudspeakers,
Bag End subwoofers and activated
sound panels by Acoustic Enhancements.
The theater has Screen Goo projection
surfaces on its wall and an Alcorn McBride
DVM8500 is its digital video source.
The Immersion Theater focuses on
making visitors part of the unbroken circle
of country music and includes clips of
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the Circle Be Unbroken” - from Jimmie
Rodgers to Lynyrd Skynyrd. This theater
has a custom Da-Lite perforated, curved
screen, three blended BenQ projectors,
and a Dataton WATCHOUT video source.
The walls are lined with murals showing
crowds of country music fans at the
annual Rhythm & Roots Reunion festival
in Bristol.
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MUSEUMS
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