Electrosonic World 18 - page 22-23

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MUSEUMS
MUSEUMS
23
Franklin D. Roosevelt
PRES I DENT I A L L I BRARY AND MUSEUM
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55-inch LCDs showing contemporary
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museum then sets the scene with an
exhibit on economic hardship in America
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and a theater presentation entitled “The
World in Crisis.”
The theater space is surrounded by a
collage of graphic images in a jagged
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into the show itself as can be seen from
the photo.
The show, presented on a large screen
and accompanied by 5.1 surround sound,
uses newsreel footage to show how the
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around the world, and in some cases
leading to the emergence of extremists.
Throughout the museum there are many
exhibits that feature 22-inch touch
screens which give additional information
about the exhibit and the circumstances
of the time. For example, the “Promise of
Change” exhibit includes an interactive
display entitled “What caused the great
depression?”
Nearby are two exhibits which introduce
Franklin D. Roosevelt, the man. One of
these, “Foundations of a Public Life,”
features an interactive table based on a
46-inch touch screen which operates as
a giant scrapbook. The other is the “Polio
Theater,” based on a 55-inch LCD with
stereo audio, which puts FDR’s disability
into contemporary perspective and shows
how he was, for the most part, able to
conceal it from the public.
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the importance of radio as a means of
communicating with the general public.
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New Deal era and the other in wartime,
recreate the experience of listening to his
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kitchen setting, and the second has a
dining room setting. In each case, there
is a choice of FDR’s original recordings,
played through old radio sets of the
period. Responses from the public can be
heard through overhead loudspeakers
There are other theaters at intervals
through the exhibition, such as “The
Enduring New Deal,” “Pearl Harbor,”
“Newsreel” and “Legacy.” Depending on
the content and on the space available,
these either use LCDs (55 or 70-inch)
or projection. An extensive exhibit on
the New Deal and FDR’s second term
is followed by a view of FDR’s private
study, and then a gallery devoted to
World War II. An interesting exhibit here
is “FDR’s Secret Map Room.” Besides
projected images on the wall, there are
three multi-user “map tables,” each
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The museum exhibition thus far is on the
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visitors descend into the basement.
Here the World War II story continues
until FDR’s untimely death. Succeeding
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Desk, with its amazing collection of
objects (interpreted by a touch screen
display) and a gallery devoted to Eleanor
Roosevelt. Finally, the “Legacy Theater”
presents an assessment of FDR’s
achievements.
AV TECHNOLOGY
Projection is by single chip DLP™
projectors from projectiondesign. Large
LCDs are from Samsung, however, the
horizontally mounted 46-inch touch
screens are from Primeview. “Small”
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Totevision. The 22-inch touch screens
are E531206 units from Elo.
All linear video is run at 1080p from
BrightSign HD1020 players. Except for
the ELO devices, displays are fed using
CAT-6 cables and Extron DTP DVI 301
extenders.
“Show” audio is processed through a
Peavey MediaMatrix DSP system and
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audio only” exhibits use Technovision
TecMP3 audio servers. The “Fireside
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industrial MP3 players.
Loudspeakers are mainly from the JBL
“Control” range. Some exhibits use NXT
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use Dakota focused arrays.
All exhibit AV equipment is centrally
controlled using Medialon Manager.
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opened by him in 1941. The new museum displays were designed by Gallagher &
Associates. These incorporate extensive AV support to assist the narrative and
help interpret the exhibits. Interactive AV content was by Cortina Productions with
linear AV content by Monadnock Media. The AV consultant was David Rome and AV
systems integration was by Electrosonic working under subcontract to the exhibit
fabricator Explus.
The World in Crisis
Photographs (left to right):
• FDR gave his Library and Museum to the American people
for operation through the National Archives.
• The portrait of FDR at the entrance
• Typical touch screen display, this one on the subject of
“What caused the great depression?”
• “Foundations of a Public Life” touch table
• The Secret Map Room exhibit
• The Legacy Theater
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