Electrosonic World 18 - page 32-33

32
VISITOR CENTERS
VISITOR CENTERS
33
Bright White Ltd was appointed to
develop the interpretation concept,
complete the exhibition design and
supervise its realization. It depends on
high quality projection, and Electrosonic
worked with Bright White over a period
of three years to design and engineer
the fully automatic show presentation
systems.
Visitors pick up their pre-booked tickets
at the shop at the entrance and are given
in return a pair of 3D glasses to wear
inside the experience. A major feature
of the center is the “Battle Room”
where you can either play or observe
a 40-minute Battle Game or watch a
10-minute Battle Show. Battle Room
activity can be observed as part of the
main tour, but if you want to participate
in a game or show, you have to book a
time.
The exhibition is divided into “Prologue,”
“Prepare for Battle,” “Character
Stations,” “The Battle Room” and
“Epilogue.” The “Prologue” is presented
in the style of a puppet theater. It
introduces some of the main characters
and the circumstances which led up to
the battle. Visitors then move to the
largest exhibition area “Prepare for
Battle.” Four large screens surround the
space and present a continuous sequence
of spectacular life-size 3D images.
The show on the big screens tells
multiple stories. Iconic moments from
the battle, such as when Robert the
Bruce encounters Sir Henry de Bohun
RQ WKH ƃUVW GD\ DUH VKRZQ EXW WKH PDLQ
emphasis is on the two sides preparing
for battle. This allows demonstrations
Bannockburn
THE BATTLE GAME
Every visit culminates in the chance to
lead a division of medieval soldiers from
Robert the Bruce and Edward II’s armies
in the dramatic Battle Game, taking
command of the knights and soldiers who
fought in 1314. Who wins the battle of
Bannockburn? The visitor decides, as they
put their wits against their fellow visitors
RQ D YLUWXDO EDWWOHƃHOG
Visitors are allocated an army division
which appears on a massive 3D map. At
the visitors’ call, archers attack, shiltrons
stand strong, cavalry advance, all with
the aim of destroying the opposing army,
protecting their King, and on Edward II’s
side, relieving Stirling Castle.
The Battle Game, developed by games
specialist D3T, is based on a relief
representation of the battle terrain on
which is projected both the terrain details
and all the troop movements that take
place during the battle. There can be up
to 30 participants, but the game itself is
controlled by the Battlemaster who is on
KDQG WR ƄHVK RXW KLVWRULFDO GHWDLOV DQG
throw in tips and advice before declaring
the successful side, summarizing the
results of the action with an overview of
how the battle played out in 1314, and
revealing the 21st-century version of the
ODQGVFDSH DQG ORFDWLRQV RI FRQƄLFW
The AV system at the center was
designed by Electrosonic’s Design
Consulting team; it was engineered and
installed by Electrosonic’s Edinburgh
RƅFH ZLWK UDFN EXLOGLQJ DW (OHFWURVRQLFŪV
'DUWIRUG RƅFH
RI GLƂHUHQW ZHDSRQV WR EH JLYHQ Ŧ DOO
part of a process to prepare visitors
for their participation in the Battle
Game. One sequence has arrows from
longbows being shot across the space – a
SDUWLFXODUO\ HƂHFWLYH XVH RI '
7KH ƃOPV VKRZQ LQ ŭ3UHSDUH IRU %DWWOHŮ
and in the Character Stations were all
developed by expert 3D modelers at
the Centre for Digital Documentation
and Visualisation (CDDV), a partnership
between the Glasgow School of Art’s
Digital Design Studios and Historic
6FRWODQG ZLWK ƃQDO GLUHFWLRQ E\ &HQWUH
6FUHHQ 3URGXFWLRQV $OWKRXJK WKH ƃOPV
were computer generated, all live action
was based on real people and real action,
using both laser scan and motion capture
WHFKQLTXHV 7KH ƃJKW FKRUHRJUDSK\ ZDV
by the Clanranald Trust for Scotland.
The Prologue, Epilogue and main show
are all based on 3D projection. After
evaluating options, it was decided that
WKH PRVW FRVW HƂHFWLYH PHWKRG DQG WKH
least complex from the point of view of
both the visitor and the operation of the
center, was to use polarizing glasses to
resolve the 3D image. These are card-
mounted and are given to visitors to
be kept as souvenirs. Each projection
screen is equipped with two projectors
ZLWK DSSURSULDWH ƃOWHUV DQG WKH VFUHHQV
themselves are part of the exhibition
structure painted with a special matte
white screen paint which preserves
polarization. The system uses linear
polarization which was found to give
the best results when tested on full size
mock-ups of the exhibits at the Glasgow
School of Art.
The Battle of Bannockburn site, on the edge of Stirling in Scotland,
is marked by a memorial rotunda and the famous statue of King
Robert on his horse by Pilkington Jackson. Both were unveiled in
1964 for the 650th anniversary, and both have now been renovated
for the 700th. A nearby “heritage center” has been removed, and a
FRPSOHWHO\ QHZ YLVLWRU FHQWHU LQ D GLƂHUHQW SRVLWLRQ DQG EHƃWWLQJ
the 21st century, opened in the spring of 2014. It was developed by
a partnership between the National Trust for Scotland and Historic
Scotland, supported by the Scottish Government and the Heritage
/RWWHU\ )XQG
in
The “Battle Game.” Note the Battlemaster standing at his twin screen console and
the “mood images” projected onto the surrounding walls.
See also the photo on the front cover.
The audience is immersed in the “prepare for battle” images
and accompanying 7.1 sound.
/RQJERZV DERXW WR ƃUH DUURZV WKURXJK WKH DXGLHQFH LQ WKH ' SUHVHQWDWLRQ
Character Stations use stacked LCDs and
directional loudspeakers.
1...,12-13,14-15,16-17,18-19,20-21,22-23,24-25,26-27,28-29,30-31 34-35,36-37,38-39,40-41,42-43,44-45,46-47,48
Powered by FlippingBook